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East Coast hip hop different than Dubai Style

Posted by Ahmad Salahat on August 2, 2010 at 4:00 PM

 

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outfit attire garments wear clothes shoe boot runner trainer Walkers and sneakers heavy gold chains and women jewellery large gold earrings dance baseball caps and sports bra the Nike capture of soon-to-be superstar dubai basketball protege Michael Jordan rivals Adidas practice as Nike dominated the urban street wear sneaker market dubai clothing brands such as Reebok, Kangol, Champion, Carhartt, and Timberland associated with the hip hop scene the East coast with hip hop acts such rock as Wu-Tang Clan and Gangster sporting the look. Gangsta rap pioneers N.W.A. popularized an early form of Cholo Gangsta style Chicago Gangs Dickies pants, plaid shirts and dubai jackets, Chuck Taylors sneakers, with black Raiders baseball dubai caps and Raiders Starter jackets. Starter jackets, popular trend status-symbol, the jackets reported in the media. Hip hop fashion photo shoot act video film cast in this period also influenced high fashion designs. Isaac Mizrahi, inspired by wore a heavy gold chain, showed a collection deeply influenced by hip hop dubai fashion. Models wore black catsuits, gold chains, big gold nameplate-inspired belts, and black bomber jackets with fur-trimmed hoods. Women wear Daily "homeboy chic." Chanel showed hip-hop-inspired fashion in several shows. In one, models wore black leather jackets and piles of gold chains. they wore long black dresses, accessorized with heavy, padlocked silver chains. (These silver chains were dubai remarkably similar to the metal chain-link and padlock worn by Treach of Naughty by Nature, in solidarity with all the brothers who are locked down. The hip hop trend, however last designers influences gangster Bling-bling dance jewellery of throwback jerseys by Mitchell & Ness Sports jerseys baggy pants, Du Rag dubai hoodie


East Coast hiphop is a regional subgenre of hiphop music that originated in New York City, USA during the 1970s. East Coast hiphop has been noted as the first and original form of hiphop.[1] The style emerged as a definitive subgenre after artists from other regions of the United States dance emerged with different styles.

Musical style

In contrast to the simplistic rhyme pattern and scheme utilized in old school hiphop, East Coast hiphop has been noted for its emphasis on lyrical dexterity.[2] It has also been characterized by multi-syllabic rhymes, complex wordplay, a continuous free-flowing delivery and intricate metaphors.[2] While East Coast hiphop does not have a uniform sound or standard style, it tends to gravitate to dance aggressive beats and sample collages.[1] The aggressive and hard-hitting beats of the form were emphasized by such acts as EPMD and Public Enemy, while artists such as Eric B. & Rakim, Boogie Down Productions, Big Daddy Kane and Slick Rick were noted for their lyrical dubai skill.[1] Lyrical themes throughout the history of East Coast hiphop have ranged from lyrical consciousness by such artists as Public Enemy and A Tribe Called Quest to mafioso rap themes by rappers such as Raekwon and Kool G Rap.[2]

History

Emergence of hiphop on the East Coast (1970–1980s)

Main articles: Roots of hiphop and Old school hiphop

East coast hiphop is occasionally referred to as New York rap due to its origins and development at block parties thrown in New York City during the 1970s.[2] According to Allmusic, "At the dawn of the hiphop era, all rap was East Coast rap."[1] Early artists of the form, including DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, the Sugarhill Gang, Kurtis Blow, Jam Master Jay and Run-D.M.C., pioneered East Coast hiphop during hiphop's development.[1] As the genre developed, lyrical themes evolved through the work of East Coast artists such as the Native Tongues, a collective of hiphop artists associated with generally positive, Afrocentric themes, and assembled by Afrika Bambaataa. New York-based groups such as De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and the Jungle Brothers also earned recognition for their musical eclecticism.[1]

The East Coast Renaissance (early to mid–1990s)

Though East Coast hiphop was dominant throughout the late 1980s, N.W.A's Straight Outta Compton presented the toughened sound of West Coast hiphop, which was accompanied by gritty, street-level subject matter.[1] In 1992, Dr. Dre's G-Funk record The Chronic would introduce West Coast hiphop to the mainstream. Along with a combined ability to retain its primary function as party music, the West Coast form of hiphop became a dominant force during the early 1990s.[1] Although G-Funk was the most popular variety of hiphop during the early 1990s, the East Coast hiphop scene remained an integral part of the music industry. Several New York City rappers rising from the local underground scene, began releasing noteworthy albums in the early and mid nineties.[3] Music writer David Drake of Stylus Magazine wrote of hiphop during 1994 and its contributions, stating:

The beats were hot, the rhymes were hot - it really was an amazing time for hiphop and music in general. This was the critical point for the East Coast, a time when rappers from the New York area were releasing bucketloads of thrilling work - Digable Planets, Gang Starr, Pete Rock, Jeru, O.C., Organized Konfusion - I mean, this was a year of serious music.[3]

—David Drake

Nas's debut album Illmatic has been noted as a high point of the East Coast hiphop scene, and featured production from such renown New York-based producers as Large Professor, Pete Rock and DJ Premier.[3] Gabe Gloden of Stylus Magazine later wrote, "From my perspective in the Midwest, the market was dominated by West Coast hiphop, and these albums didn’t make much of a dent in West Coast sales, but with time, these albums filtered their way into everyone’s collections."

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